FLRC Challenge Prize Calculator ready for a look

I’m already going through leaderboard withdrawal, @Challengers, but I’ve kept busy with post-Challenge wrapup. Yesterday I picked up all the course markers (which weathered the year wonderfully), and today I populated a spreadsheet with what I believe are all the prize winners. We ended up with 194 prizes all told, divided among 38 winners!

Since there was quite a bit of copying and pasting to move all the data over, it’s entirely possible that I’ve made a mistake somewhere along the way. So if you think you should have won one or more prizes, please check the FLRC Challenge Prize Calculator in Google Sheets and let me know if anything seems amiss.

A few notes:

  • Refer to the FLRC Challenge Prizes page for details on who wins what and how that’s calculated. Even though we had only 194 runners, I calculated the prizes as though we had 200 to make for even numbers. The per-runner multipliers remain set at 50¢ for the overall points and miles winners and 5¢ for all the rest except for the age-group winners, whose multiplier is 2.5¢.

  • If you search on your name using your browser’s search capability, it will highlight all instances so you can scroll through and check everything. I spot-checked a number of them, so I believe my formulas are correct, but let me know if you see a problem.

  • A few people won the same prize, such as Pete Kresock and Karen Ingall tying for Most Miles and Ruth Sproul and Anne Shakespeare running together for a number of the courses and thus both winning the 60+ age group prizes.

  • For the winning @Thundering-30s team, I selected the top ten runners through the intersection of the top age grade scorers and those who logged the most runs. That matches up with how the team scoring works with a combination of age grading and most runs.

Any questions, feel free to ask!

Thanks to Liz Hartman’s eagle eye, I’ve updated the Prize Calculator slightly to account for the fact that Gabrielle Woo ran the fastest age-group time for the Waterfront Trail course (after winner Jullien Flynn) for both the 1-29 age group and the 30-39 age group. On 4/14, as a 29-year-old, Gabby ran 20:48 (ahead of Molly Doruska’s 21:59) and then on 12/14, as a 30-year-old, Gabby ran 19:51 (ahead of Margaret Frank’s 19:54).

It’s tricky to see when someone ran their fastest time after aging up into the next age group in the middle of the year because the pop-up menu in the leaderboard that’s filters by age group is tied to the teams, where people stick with the team matching their age on January 1st. However, the age that’s connected to each fastest time does match the runner’s actual age.

So, @Challengers, if you think you or someone you know qualifies for an award based on running a faster time on some course after you aged up, please let me know right away!

This is so fun!
I honestly didn’t expect any winnings. Can I donate my prize to FLRC? The glory is good enough for me.
Thank you SO MUCH Adam. And all the others who worked on the back end etc. This has just been amazingly well organized and wow you pulled it off.
In gratitude.

Clearly we’ll have to make next year’s leaderboard have a prize page, @steve-desmond. :slight_smile: Onward and upward!

No, Jean-Luc, we’ve already done all the behind-the-scenes work to give @Ian the money, and @elizabeth.r.dawson1 just told me that she’s applied the money to everyone’s account (you have one now). So thanks for the kind thought about donating to FLRC, but you’ll just have to go down to the store and figure out something you want that’s at least $55. Surely you’ll need a new pair of shoes sooner or later.

I’ll say more about this soon, but for anyone seeing this, that’s the way the prizes work—they’re just recorded in your account at the running store. So the next time you buy something there, it will be available when you check out.